The C2C Ideas Archive

Does the West Want Out?

Blocking pipelines to “phase out” energy production from Alberta’s oilsands has nothing to do with saving the planet. It’s about Eastern Canada screwing the West to take the Rest. Always has been, always will be, unless…

The Trump Awakening

The dream of globalization keeps getting interrupted by the reality of stubborn human cultural differences. It occurred again recently when a naïve American tourist defied warnings against visiting an island in the Indian Ocean inhabited by a primitive tribe, and was killed by their arrows. It also occurred when Donald Trump was elected President of the United States. Canadians are conditioned to see such things as unfortunate bumps on the inevitable road to global homogeneity. Our American cousins are not so sanguine; that’s why they elected Trump. Maybe we can learn something from them about life in the real world, writes Lloyd W. Robertson.

Put down that legal joint and put your hands up

Canadian stoners are already longing for the good old days of criminalized cannabis where it was easy to get excellent weed at a fair price with decent customer service and low risk of getting busted. Now that it’s ‘legal’ they’re confused and fearful about where they can smoke, what they can grow, how much they can carry, and how long they must wait after toking before they can drive or go to work. And that’s only if they can find any. Legalization is working for some, though: the former cops and politicians who used to prosecute potheads and are now dealing the stuff. Karen Selick reports.

If you liked Duffy and Gomeshi, you’re gonna love this

Oh man, what a movie this is going to be. It’s got money, power, and political intrigue. The central characters include a top-rank naval commander facing de facto treason charges and a criminal defence lawyer who’s so good she even got Jian Gomeshi off. They’re up against some big dogs in the Liberal cabinet, including PMJT himself, over a scandal about procuring…a ship. And the climax is set to occur in the middle of next year’s election campaign! Paul Stanway reports.

Who are government apologies really for?

Last week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued a formal apology, on behalf of the government and people of Canada, for something another Liberal government did 79 years ago. It’s his fourth apology for his predecessors’ actions in just three years. This time it’s for the passengers of the MS St. Louis, Jews looking to escape Nazi Germany in 1939, because Canada refused them asylum here. It was a terrible decision with horrible consequences, but obviously Trudeau’s belated apology does nothing to help the victims. So who benefits? Well, writes James Coggins, it makes the PM look good.

How lower taxes could lower emissions

Canada’s federal government insists the only way to reduce carbon emissions is by putting a price on them. But it will take a helluva price to coerce Canadians to reduce their driving enough to make a dent in transportation emissions, which are a huge contributor. That’s why the provinces are revolting against Ottawa and the 2019 federal election is shaping up as a referendum on carbon taxation. Gwyn Morgan has a radically better idea that would massively reduce emissions without punishing consumers: incent Canadians to convert their vehicles from gasoline and diesel to far cleaner-burning natural gas by making NGV fuel tax-free. Lower Taxes for Lower Emissions sure sounds like a better campaign slogan than Pay Up or Park Your Car.

A century of remembrance

2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War. Despite the passage of time, the events of that terrible human tragedy still have the power to horrify, inspire, and unleash our tears. Lest we forget the sacrifices of the Canadians who fought and died in that war and all the military conflicts that have tested our nation’s mettle, C2C Journal is marking Armistice Day with an essay by John Weissenberger that is bookended by the stories of the first and last Canadians who died in the Great War.

Socialist workers dystopia

Bribing voters with their own, other people’s, or borrowed money has a long history in Canada. The latest example is the Liberal government’s plan to price “pollution” in provinces without a carbon tax by making the tax rebate bigger than the tax itself. Another form of vote-buying, writes Matthew Lau, is labour regulation that forces employers to pay workers higher wages and provide greater benefits. When Ontario’s late Wynne government did this, it predictably hurt job growth. So the bribe failed, and the Ford government is now partially deregulating the labour market to make workers, and the provincial economy, more competitive.

Hard times and strange bedfellows

The line-up of speakers at last week’s hastily organized Energy Relaunch conference in Calgary was about as eclectic as you could get. It brought together pro- and anti-carbon tax conservatives and academics and journalists and a former federal Liberal leadership contender and even an Alberta NDP minister. Astonishingly, they all agreed on something: Ottawa has bungled energy and environment policy and Canada needs to get competitive on natural resource development again or we’ll all be much poorer.