• Military procurement is to Canada’s federal government as sewer upgrades are to municipal governments: a hugely expensive necessity that doesn’t win any votes. That’s why the RCAF is getting by with patched-up, near-obsolete CF-18s and a handful of used fighter jets from Australia as Ottawa’s posturing and procrastinating over their replacement enters its third decade. Meanwhile, military tensions between the world’s major powers are growing, which leaves weakly-armed and weak-willed countries like Canada increasingly useless and vulnerable. The ill-starred F-35 stealth fighter remains the best bet to restore our military capability while providing top-flight aerospace jobs, writes Mathew Preston, but “whipping out” the F-35 or any new warplanes is not a priority for Justin Trudeau’s feminist-pacifist administration.

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  • A police officer pulls you over on suspicion for some crime and seizes your car. Charges are never laid. But you don’t get your car back. Highway robbery by a rogue cop? Nope, this kind of seizure is perfectly legal, and not uncommon, in provinces that have civil forfeiture laws. It’s tarted up as compensation for victims of crime, but governments pocket most of the proceeds. Karen Selick’s story on this institutionalized abuse of due process focuses on the nightmarish persecution of Ontarians Maggie and Terry Reilly, innocent victims whose financial and personal lives were crippled by faceless bureaucrats who will never be held to account.

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  • Could the populist uprising now sweeping much of the western world erupt in Canada? The idea is as horrifying as it is inconceivable in the minds of the Laurentian intelligentsia. That explains their disdain for Stephen Harper’s new book Right Here, Right Now, a rumination on the causes and effects of Trump, Brexit, et al. But Barry Cooper thinks Harper is on to something in identifying the end of the Cold War, and the subsequent acceleration of globalization, as the catalysts for the “age of disruption” now upon us. Liberal and progressive elites are themselves becoming increasingly demagogic and reactionary in trying to put down the uprising, but their beloved “Universal and Homogenous State” may be headed for the dustbin of history, even in Canada.

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  • Canada has been singularly successful in offering up its natural resource sector to its enemies. In the 1980s and 90s, foreign-funded eco- and aboriginal activists teamed up with Canadian politicians, public sector unions, and even some corporate sell-outs to bully the B.C. forest industry into submission. Today it’s the energy sector that has been taken hostage and climbed into bed with its captors. Many of the same politicians and CEOs who sold Canada out for a myth of “social licence” are now changing their tune, writes Mark Milke, but it will take time to recover from the economic damage they’ve wrought.

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  • What does it take to stop a multi-billion-dollar energy project that will create thousands of jobs and billions in tax revenues for Canadians? The answer is the headline on this story. Never has so much been withheld from so many by so few. Yet this week the federal government announced there will be no time limit on yet another round of “consultations” over the Trans Mountain pipeline. This is no way to run a credible country, writes Gwyn Morgan.

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  • Border security, terrorism, rising crime, Donald Trump, guns, trade wars; these are just a few of the anxieties afflicting Canadians. Well, pass the Zoloft, writes Jason Unrau. We’re going to need it to get through the coming year as politicians of all stripes and their media enablers ratchet up their fearmongering on these and other real and invented terrors in the runup to next October’s federal election.

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  • Historical cleansing in the name of ethnocentric injustice is all the rage in Canada today. We’re arresting, trying and punishing historical figures for crimes against modern interpretations of their words and actions. First among the fallen icons is the country’s founding prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, recently banished from a pedestal outside Victoria City Hall to a dingy civic warehouse where he awaits final sentencing. But John Robson has a message for those who deposed the Old Chieftain; you are not worthy to stand in the shadow of his statue.

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  • The ever-shifting scope of the constitutional “duty to consult” with aboriginal groups increasingly thwarts development in Canada, including resource projects critical to the country’s economic growth and prosperity. The recent court decision against the Trans Mountain pipeline is the highest-profile recent example. University of Calgary professor emeritus Tom Flanagan tracks the jurisprudence that elevated this legal concept into a de facto aboriginal veto and suggests ways that governments, with the support of pro-development aboriginal groups, could move to clearly define and limit its power.

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