Author: Rodney A. Clifton

Some Other Truths About Indian Residential Schools

The Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission will release its Final Report next month. Among its findings and recommendations is expected to be a call for the history of residential schools to be taught in Canadian schools. But will the Commission, and the curricula based on its findings, tell the whole truth? Or just the parts that fit the current “genocide” narrative? Rodney Clifton worked in those schools (and his wife went to one), and his experience and research offers four key points that ought to be part of the historical record. First, only a small minority of Aboriginal children attended residential schools. Second, non-Aboriginal children also attended residential schools in significant numbers. Third, Aboriginal children were not systematically punished for speaking their native languages. And fourth, no one knows how many Aboriginal residential school students died of abuse and neglect. Acknowledging those facts might actually advance the cause of truth and reconciliation.

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The “Tolerant” University

Since the 1960s, the number of university students has expanded much faster than the growth in the Canadian population. Along with this exponential expansion, there has been a diminution in academic standards and an increase in incivility. Rodney A. Clifton argues that university students are replacing the traditional values of civility and responsibility with modern values based on relativism.

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Truth, Reconciliation, and Aboriginal Residential Schools: A Reply to Michael Ignatieff

Late in the autumn of 2007, approximately 87,000 aboriginal people who attended the 130 residential schools, many of which were administered by the Anglican, Methodist, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, and United churches, began receiving payments from the Federal government. For these people, the payment is $10,000 for their first year, or part of it, in residence, and $3,000 for each subsequent year, or part it.

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