Author: Paul Bunner

Good News From C2C Journal

C2C Journal is pleased to announce that thanks to the loyal and generous support of our readers, contributors and donors, the Journal is immediately increasing volume and frequency of original stories and essays, expanding staff, unveiling a redesigned website, and launching a sustained social media marketing push on multi-media platforms. Editor Paul Bunner has the details.

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One step forward, two steps back for freedom

When he wasn’t kayaking on or swimming in the North Saskatchewan River near his home in Edmonton, C2C Journal editor Paul Bunner spent some of his summer fighting two battles for little freedoms in his local community. He won one and lost one. Although he’s a veteran political activist at the federal and provincial level, Bunner contends that the lifeblood of democracy must be nurtured at the foundations of society if it is to flourish at the top.

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The Last Front Page

The rapidly shrinking newspaper business raises all kinds of questions. What will we wrap fish guts in? How will we light backyard fires? And where will we get reasonably accurate and important stories about what’s going on in our community, our country, and the world? The internet? Where global editor-bots decide what’s news? Where politicians can lie with impunity? Where fake news outsells real news? The short answer is yes. The longer and more encouraging answer is in the Spring edition of C2C Journal, which launches today with editor Paul Bunner’s lead editorial and career newspaperman Paul Stanway’s lament for the ink-stained wretches of yesterday’s news.

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Situational sexism: Lock her up vs a punch in the face

At an anti-carbon tax rally at the Alberta Legislature in November, the crowd briefly mocked NDP Premier Rachel Notley with the “lock her up” chant that erupted at an Donald Trump campaign rallies whenever he attacked Hillary Clinton. It became a huge story, hailed as evidence that Trumpian sexism was spilling across the border. Last weekend, a young male demonstrator at anti-Trump “Women’s March” rally at the same location punched a female reporter for the right-wing Rebel Media in the face. The media response? Crickets at first, then skepticism. C2C editor Paul Bunner ponders the double standard.

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The New Campus Rebels: C2C Journal’s Winter 2016 Edition

Trigger warning: the Winter 2016 edition of C2C Journal contains ideas and opinions that are not tolerated on many university campuses today. Some of them may offend human rights codes, refuse to acknowledge identities, and even question “settled science”. But if you believe provocation in defence of free expression is no vice then take heart, you are not alone, as you will discover in a collection of essays and articles about the rising backlash against politically correct tyranny, on campus and elsewhere, starting with Paul Bunner’s lead editorial, Jason VandenBeukel’s profile of University of Toronto counterrevolutionary Jordan Peterson, and Jason Tucker’s exclusive interview with Peterson.

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The art of conservatism

Some progressives would argue that “art of conservatism” is an oxymoron. That would be typically dismissive of a rich history of conservative ideals expressed through art. But it would ring true of contemporary conservatism, which is reflexively hostile to modern art and artists. The fall edition of C2C Journal seeks to challenge this self-defeating assumption in a collection of stories and essays about art, artists and arts policy, starting today with editor Paul Bunner’s introductory editorial and Brigitte Pellerin’s compelling argument for supporting conservative art.

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Democracy in America

The 2016 U.S. presidential campaign is an unrivalled spectacle of political entertainment that is by turns fascinating, repulsive, and worrying. As the primaries wind down and the main event begins, C2C Journal launches its Summer Edition on the theme of Democracy in America. The title, borrowed from the famous 1835 book by French political philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville, heralds the overarching theme of ten essays we will publish over the course of June, starting with Trevor Shelley’s examination of Tocqueville’s remarkably prescient hopes and fears for the country that became the world’s strongest defender of democracy but is now making a mockery of it.

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Notes from the political wilderness

A thousand Canadian conservative politicians and activists are gathered in Ottawa this month for the annual Manning Centre Conference. With conservatives out of power almost everywhere, the theme of the Conference is “recharging the right”. The Spring 2016 edition of C2C Journal complements this theme by examining what conservatives got right – and wrong – during their time in power, and what they might do to find their way back from the political wilderness. The edition launches today with editor Paul Bunner’s lead editorial and a reflection on Stephen Harper’s legacy by George Koch and Martin Grün.

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What Now for Canadian Energy?

C2C Journal editor Paul Bunner opens the 2015 Winter Edition with a preview of its timely theme – energy and the environment. As the massive global climate change summit opens in Paris, Canada’s energy-fuelled economy is in dire straits. Oil and gas prices are down, taxes and regulations are up, job losses are mounting, and investment is fleeing to jurisdictions where it is actually possible to get pipelines and other energy infrastructure built. Former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s dream of making Canada an “energy superpower” has stalled, and his successors are trying to keep the oil flowing by putting a generous coat of green lipstick on our energy pig. Let us pray that it gets the global warmists off our case.

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Darkness descends on “sunny ways”

What if the horrific Islamist assault on Paris last Friday had occurred just a few weeks earlier, before the October 19 Canadian federal election? Would voters have felt differently about Bill C-51, bombing ISIS, opening the door to refugees, stripping citizenship from terrorists, and banning the niqab? Probably, but it doesn’t matter. What matters is how the young Trudeau government handles refugee and security policy in the aftermath of the Paris attacks. Our western allies are tightening their borders and escalating the war against ISIS. But the Liberals, writes Paul Bunner, are stubbornly sticking to their election script.

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