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Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls Marion Buller

Indigenous Genocide? Welcome to Canada!

$92 million and thousands of pages later, and what have we got? An outrageous debasement of the word “genocide” to describe 32 murders per year of Indigenous females, complete disregard for Indigenous male murder victims, the prospect that Canada will be trashed on the world stage, and demand for still more “redress” and “compensation.” Anthropologist Hymie Rubenstein unpacks the tortured thinking of the National Inquiry on Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls and uses the profound witness of actual genocides to refute its awful claims.

Medical Tourism

On the Road Again

Canadians are inveterate travellers, but they don’t go abroad merely to appreciate the Louvre’s great art, find their true purpose through a swami in India, build houses for the poor in Nicaragua or get sloshed poolside in Cabo. For all-too-many, it’s about maintaining their ability to walk or even saving their life. C2C Journal’s George Koch looks into “medical tourism”, evaluating the statistics and asking how we might keep more health care dollars at home.

They Burn Witches, Don’t They

Smear, denounce, attack, delegitimize and wreck their career. The twisted toolbox of today’s left – including here in Canada – should be growing familiar to conservatives, for victims in virtually all walks of life topple almost daily. One of the latest is sociologist Ricardo Duchesne, long of the University of New Brunswick but, as of last week, no longer. David Solway illuminates the sordid saga of a solid researcher and author becoming the left’s racist du jour.

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The real cost of bad history

Possibly the most momentous assertion Justice Hennessy made and, if allowed to stand, the finding with the greatest implications for other Indigenous litigation is her ruling that the treaties were not meant to be one-time transactions but “future-oriented agreements situated within an ongoing relationship.” In other words, not final, but subject to change.

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Nixon in China

Only one presidential trip in memory has resulted in the creation of a famous political saying. From Richard Nixon’s seminal visit to China in 1972 came the “Nixon Goes to China Rule” of politics, the crux of which is that the politician perceived to be least likely to do something will actually have the easiest time doing it.

The real truth about fake news

This article does not contain the real story about what happened on 9/11 or Barack
Obama’s Kenyan birth certificate or proof that the Democrats operated a child sex ring in a Washington pizza joint. Instead it is Alexandra Pope’s rueful exploration of the fake news phenomenon and its explosive growth on social media. There’s a lie and a sucker who believes it born every millisecond on the Internet, and it’s getting harder and harder to separate fact from fiction. But Pope says there’s one sure way to get real news on the web –pay for it.

L’Etat, c’est nous

Nationalism is in foul odour these days, tainted by its association with Donald Trump’s clumsy protectionist economic and immigration policies, the Brexit mess, and various truculent populist movements in Europe. But did you hear Chief Justice Richard Wagner of the Supreme Court of Canada the other day, talking about Canada as a “moral values” superpower? The ink on the SCC judgement against religious freedom in the Trinity Western University case was hardly dry, and he was boasting about his nationalistic pride in Canada’s secular, progressive superiority. In TWU, Wagner and a majority of his colleagues imposed their own beliefs about what they see as the “public interest”, writes John Carpay, which is at least as arrogant – and ominous – as anything being undertaken by nationalists outside of Canada.

Nixon in China

Only one presidential trip in memory has resulted in the creation of a famous political saying. From Richard Nixon’s seminal visit to China in 1972 came the “Nixon Goes to China Rule” of politics, the crux of which is that the politician perceived to be least likely to do something will actually have the easiest time doing it.

The real truth about fake news

This article does not contain the real story about what happened on 9/11 or Barack
Obama’s Kenyan birth certificate or proof that the Democrats operated a child sex ring in a Washington pizza joint. Instead it is Alexandra Pope’s rueful exploration of the fake news phenomenon and its explosive growth on social media. There’s a lie and a sucker who believes it born every millisecond on the Internet, and it’s getting harder and harder to separate fact from fiction. But Pope says there’s one sure way to get real news on the web –pay for it.

L’Etat, c’est nous

Nationalism is in foul odour these days, tainted by its association with Donald Trump’s clumsy protectionist economic and immigration policies, the Brexit mess, and various truculent populist movements in Europe. But did you hear Chief Justice Richard Wagner of the Supreme Court of Canada the other day, talking about Canada as a “moral values” superpower? The ink on the SCC judgement against religious freedom in the Trinity Western University case was hardly dry, and he was boasting about his nationalistic pride in Canada’s secular, progressive superiority. In TWU, Wagner and a majority of his colleagues imposed their own beliefs about what they see as the “public interest”, writes John Carpay, which is at least as arrogant – and ominous – as anything being undertaken by nationalists outside of Canada.

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