CURRENT NEWS AND IDEAS

My Platonic Conversion

Like many young people, Johnathan Strathdee got his progressive ideals from the public education system. In high school he learned that capitalism is unfair, oppression is endemic, and environmental catastrophe is imminent. Then he read Plato and learned that the world is not so simple.

Adam Smith Meets Big Bear

Tom Flanagan’s new book The Wealth of First Nations comes at a time when more and more Indigenous leaders and communities are embracing the market economy, resource development, and entrepreneurship. Across every social and economic metric, the Makers are outperforming the Takers, which points the way to less dependence, more integration, and even, perhaps, true reconciliation.

Wrecking the Federation to Save the Planet

The federal carbon tax came into effect this week in Ontario, Manitoba, New Brunswick and Saskatchewan. It may soon be imposed in Alberta, depending on the outcome of this month’s election. Starting with Saskatchewan, the provinces are taking Ottawa to court over who has the right to regulate greenhouse gases under Canada’s constitution. The much larger question is how the case will affect the balance of powers within the federation.

THE ASK

C2C Journal is a donor-supported publication. If you enjoy what you read here please consider making a tax-deductible donation to help us create more and better content. Fake news is free. Real, reliable, fair journalism costs money.

HOT READS

THIS MONTH’S MOST READ C2C STORIES

Goddamn the CBC

For over a century “Goddamn the CPR” was an all-purpose curse unions, western farmers, and others used against the all-powerful Canadian railway. Today the curse could be repurposed to express frustration with the all-powerful CBC state media conglomerate. Critiquing its cost, bias, and programming is a recurring theme here at C2C, including in this piece by Fred Litwin.

The Sorriest Prime Minister Canada’s Ever Had

A Google search of “Justin Trudeau apology” produces over 600,000 hits. Since we published James Coggins’ story “Who Are Government Apologies Really For?” last fall, the prime minister has issued two more apologies for things other governments did; to the Inuit for Ottawa’s handling of tuberculosis in the mid-20th century; and to Indigenous alumni of residential schools in Newfoundland and Labrador. That raises his total to six, the most ever by a PM.

Which One Doesn’t Belong? Lougheed, Klein, Notley, Kenney

One of the sillier narratives competing for traction in the Alberta election is that Rachel Notley and Jason Kenney are modern incarnations of, respectively, Peter Lougheed and Ralph Klein. This ignores the fact that Alberta boomed under Lougheed and has been a bust under Notley, and that Kenney is a philosophical conservative while Klein was flexible populist. Paul Stanway sorted much of this out in his review of Mark Milke’s timely book Ralph vs Rachel.

HOT READS

THIS MONTH’S MOST READ C2C STORIES

Goddamn the CBC

For over a century “Goddamn the CPR” was an all-purpose curse unions, western farmers, and others used against the all-powerful Canadian railway. Today the curse could be repurposed to express frustration with the all-powerful CBC state media conglomerate. Critiquing its cost, bias, and programming is a recurring theme here at C2C, including in this piece by Fred Litwin.

The Sorriest Prime Minister Canada’s Ever Had

A Google search of “Justin Trudeau apology” produces over 600,000 hits. Since we published James Coggins’ story “Who Are Government Apologies Really For?” last fall, the prime minister has issued two more apologies for things other governments did; to the Inuit for Ottawa’s handling of tuberculosis in the mid-20th century; and to Indigenous alumni of residential schools in Newfoundland and Labrador. That raises his total to six, the most ever by a PM.

Which One Doesn’t Belong? Lougheed, Klein, Notley, Kenney

One of the sillier narratives competing for traction in the Alberta election is that Rachel Notley and Jason Kenney are modern incarnations of, respectively, Peter Lougheed and Ralph Klein. This ignores the fact that Alberta boomed under Lougheed and has been a bust under Notley, and that Kenney is a philosophical conservative while Klein was flexible populist. Paul Stanway sorted much of this out in his review of Mark Milke’s timely book Ralph vs Rachel.

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