• c2c journal carbon tax canada

    It is said that some Ontarians have been driven mad by their power bills. Mad enough to finally trade in their Liberal government for a Ford-led Conservative party that has forsaken a carbon tax? We’ll see in June, but in the meantime Grant Brown has a modest proposal for all Canadians who want to save the planet without paying carbon taxes. Almost Trumpian in its genius, Brown’s plan is to levy huge import tariffs on Chinese goods manufactured with coal power, especially wind turbines and solar panels. That would lower Canadian taxes, increase exports of our clean green natural gas, boost the competitiveness of our manufacturers, massively lower global greenhouse gas emissions, and defeat carbon-taxing governments. This would be a win, win, win, win, and, for Ontarians, no Wynne!

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  • The quest for balance between rights and freedoms is largely arbitrated by democratically-elected governments and their appointed courts. Sometimes freedom prevails, and sometimes it is compromised to protect rights. In the last year, the current government in Ottawa has legislated new rights for transgendered persons in human rights and criminal law which infringe on free speech by compelling the use of gender neutral pronouns. The government has also compelled faith groups and others seeking public funding for summer jobs to declare support for reproductive and gender rights, in a clear affront to freedom of religion. And the government is hinting it will soon move to prosecute “hate speech” again in human rights law, which has a sorry record of subordinating freedoms. Lee Harding reports on the growing imbalance.

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  • If the oilsands stay in the ground and pipelines and LNG terminals don’t get built, and governments continue to suffocate other natural resource and infrastructure development with excessive taxation and regulation, a lot of Canadians could wind up like the unemployed masses in the U.S. Rust Belt states – and mad enough to vote for a populist demagogue promising to make their lives great again. We’re not there yet, writes Peter Shawn Taylor, but the current rout of capital from Canada’s oilsands represents foreclosure on thousands of high-paying blue collar jobs and raises the risk of a Trumpian political backlash.

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  • God knows why Christians still go into politics. For every good, honest, ethical one there’s a holier-than-thou hypocrite like Roy Moore, the Donald Trump acolyte who deservedly lost one of the safest Republican Senate seats in the U.S. So, not only do they have to endure the vicious smears of the secular left, but also guilt-by-association with fallen Christian pols. In Canada, Preston Manning achieved remarkable success as an explicitly Christian politician despite all these liabilities. In a new book, reviewed for C2C Journal by Patrick Keeney, Manning summons the faithful to redeem politics by running on platforms of public service and sacrifice.

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  • The escalating war of words and trade actions between the governments of Alberta and British Columbia over the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline project are a distraction from the real issue, which is whether Canada has a future as a competitive oil producing and exporting country. We’ll find that out when the Trudeau government in Ottawa decides whether to enforce the rule of law, first against the rogue NDP-Green regime in B.C., and then against the inevitable army of protestors who will blockade the pipeline if it goes ahead. Nigel Hannaford reports, skeptically.

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  • The #MeToo movement has so far concentrated on sexual misconduct by men in politics and the entertainment industry. Minor or major celebrities, most of them. The incidence of male sexual misbehaviour within these demographic cohorts, ranging from criminal assault to unwelcome comments, is said to be “rampant”. And it is, as measured by media coverage and social media reaction. But there’s no actual data on that assertion. Data does exist, however, showing that Aboriginal women suffer rates of sexual abuse much higher than non-Native women. Mark Milke wonders why #MeToo has not yet spread to places where the victims may be even more numerous.

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  • His father made a great show of evicting the state from the bedrooms of the nation but current Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is no slouch at using the power of government to enforce public morals. For instance, if you want to hire a college student to mind children at a summer camp, you now have to sign a declaration of acquiescence to the government’s moral convictions on reproductive and gender rights in order to qualify for Canada Summer Jobs funding. The lesson here, according to John Robson, is not that State shouldn’t legislate morality, but that it should do so sparingly, and only the basis of something more substantial than the secular commandments of progressivism.

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  • Stoner liberation may be at hand, but Canadians would be well advised not to delete their dial-a-doper’s number just yet. Just as occurred after alcohol prohibition ended, there will be a severe regulatory hangover after cannabis is legalized. The emerging patchwork of provincial pot laws could not have been more incoherent if it was designed by a gram-a-day toker. It’s a fair bet that Canada will see more reefer-related charges, prosecutions and convictions post-legalization than we do today. And government ganja will probably be poorer quality, more expensive and harder to get than outlaw biker bud. Bill Bewick reports, soberly.

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