• An Ontario teachers’ union wants to expel founding Canadian Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald’s name from public schools as punishment for being the “architect” of the Indian residential schools “genocide”. In hope of preventing the teachers from inflicting their breathtaking ignorance on their students and Macdonald’s reputation, C2C Journal offers a remedial history lesson by veteran Aboriginal Affairs consultant, news reporter and author Robert MacBain.

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  • Like most cultural trends, it took a few years for the conservative revolution that made Ronald Reagan U.S. president in 1980 to migrate to Canada. One of its most influential, yet least known, emissaries was Republican political genius Arthur Finkelstein. He came north to teach the National Citizens Coalition – then one of very few serious conservative advocacy groups in Canada – how to raise a right-wing ruckus, and money. Eventually his lessons would be learned by NCC president Stephen Harper, lessons that helped him become prime minister. To mark Finkelstein’s recent passing, former NCC V-P Gerry Nichols reflects on his important contributions to Canada’s conservative movement.

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  • Western Civilization has depended on poets and poetry to educate, enlighten, entertain and ennoble us since Homer charted the course of the Trojan War and the journey of Odysseus. Alas, writes Canadian poet David Solway, most of what passes for poetry today has no more artistic merit or social utility “than graffiti on freight trains”. Fortunately we have the classics and a handful of moderns who honour them to provide literary sustenance in these parched poetic times. You can discover or rediscover them in Solway’s essay in C2C Journal.

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  • Maybe it’s the current dearth of inspiring or even competent political leadership in the western world, but this summer our lonely and fragile democracies are turning their eyes to Winston Churchill and George Orwell, two men who arguably did more than anyone to rescue western civilization from tyranny in the 20th century. Churchill stars in the great movie Dunkirk and in a new biopic bearing his name. Orwell’s ideas are routinely invoked to explain the epidemic of fake news and “spin” that has infected, beyond even past practice, our highest political offices and lowest journalism. The pair are also the subject of a timely new book about the extraordinary parallels in their remarkable lives, reviewed for C2C Journal by Mark Milke.

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  • Gen Z is the label coined to describe the generation born since 1995, roughly the year the Internet came to the masses. They’re the first true “digital natives” and the first generation in a long time to face the real prospect of a poorer and less secure life than their predecessors. Marketing research indicates this has made them more pragmatic and self-reliant and thus, according to Gen Zer Haley Love, the first generation in many decades to be favourably disposed toward conservative political ideas.

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  • The western world awoke from the nightmare of the Second World War with an absolute understanding of right and wrong, good and evil. It enshrined this truth in the UN Declaration on Human Rights. The whole world signed on except the Soviets, the Saudis, the South Africans, and the science of anthropology. They all argued the West had no right to impose its values on other cultures. Seventy years on, writes Philip Carl Salzman, our human rights ideals have largely succumbed to that argument.

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  • Pierre Trudeau despised ethnic nationalism. He was contemptuous of its expression in Quebec’s separatist movement. And when the Aboriginal political leaders of his time demanded racially-segregated self-government, as prime minister he told them Canada would not let them have it without a serious – and perhaps bloody – fight. His son, current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, holds very different views. His government is promising “nation-to-nation” negotiations to formalize race-based Aboriginal self-government. On this issue, writes Robert MacBain, the apple has fallen a long way from the tree.

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  • People around the world were riveted by the pathetic story of Charlie Gard, the genetically cursed 11-month-old at the centre of a legal fight for his life between his parents and the British healthcare system. For many, it was a case of justifiable infanticide. But for McGill University biomedical ethics student Sarah Beattie, it was a chilling glimpse of what’s in the coldly utilitarian hearts of many cutting edge thinkers in her field.

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