• Ottawa Parliament Hill

    Why are Canadians so trusting of government regulations and regulators? Not only do they restrict personal and economic freedom, they routinely screw up and cause measurable harm to public health and safety. Canada needs to strike a better balance, writes Heather Bone, between government regulation and private sector self-regulation.

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  • People have been making ethical and health arguments against meat production and consumption for centuries. The vast majority of human omnivores ignore them and eat as much meat as they can afford. But now there’s a powerful new argument against meat – climate change. Cows, pigs and chickens are big contributors to greenhouse gases. As a result, writes Peter Shawn Taylor, the same folks who would wean us off carbon energy are now plotting a meat tax.

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  • hannaford-main

    One of Donald Trump’s blustery campaign promises was “if I’m president, you’re going to see Merry Christmas in department stores again, believe me.” A slap at Christophobes, it was typical of his politically incorrect comments on everything from feminism to climate change, terrorism to refugees. With President Trump setting the tone, writes Nigel Hannaford, the public square will become a much noisier, ruder and freer place.

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  • The tribunes of the social justice movement want two things above all else; protection from hurt feelings and the overthrow of Western Civilization. Those objectives are not as incongruous as they seem. A core value of Western Civilization is, or was, stoicism – from which sprang virtues like courage, sacrifice, and loyalty. Without stoicism, we are a society of grievances competing for state protections and entitlements. This way lies ruin, writes Daniel Bezalel Richardsen, in an essay informed by the Meditations of second century stoic philosopher and Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.

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  • gunn-main

    University campuses are the last place on earth you’d expect to find a hawkish fiscal lobby like the Canadian Taxpayers Federation trolling for support. But that’s exactly where they’ve taken their Generation Screwed campaign, right to the young people who are being saddled with a massive intergenerational debt by their elders. The message is going over really well with most students, writes campaign executive director Aaron Gunn, despite concerted resistance from some students’ unions, school administrators, and the usual suspects in campus social justice crowd.

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  • 19th century illustration of people burning books

    In a time where guest speakers with unapproved ideas are routinely badgered off campus stages, where bad jokes or impolitic slogans can get university students expelled, and where even academics with tenure risk losing their jobs if they dissent from administration orthodoxies, it seems fair to ask, who will put out the fires when the book-burnings begin? Well, for one, the Society for Academic Freedom and Scholarship. SAFS president Mark Mercer explains.

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  • Sexual orientation icons on white background

    Ottawa writer and conservative political activist Fred Litwin has been involved in the gay rights movement for four decades. He has seen it grow and evolve to include a wide range of people who genuinely need and deserve legal rights and protections. But he’s had it with the militants in the modern transgender rights movement. In their rejection of biological reality and nonsensical demands for social and legal accommodations, writes Litwin, they are corrupting medicine, undermining free speech, and threatening the legitimacy of the mainstream gay rights movement.

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  • keeney-main

    Pushback against oppressive political correctness on university campuses is erupting all over the western world. A new collection of essays by authors from both sides of the Atlantic is yet another indication that social justice warriors have gone too far and provoked a broad, determined and eloquent opposition to rise up in defence of academic freedom, the cornerstone of intellectual inquiry and democratic debate in a free society. Patrick Keeney reviews Unsafe Space: The Crisis of Free Speech on Campus

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