• keeney-main

    Pushback against oppressive political correctness on university campuses is erupting all over the western world. A new collection of essays by authors from both sides of the Atlantic is yet another indication that social justice warriors have gone too far and provoked a broad, determined and eloquent opposition to rise up in defence of academic freedom, the cornerstone of intellectual inquiry and democratic debate in a free society. Patrick Keeney reviews Unsafe Space: The Crisis of Free Speech on Campus

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  • Main - Milke

    Remembrance Day is as good a time as any to contemplate the many men and a few women scattered throughout history who combined utopian demagoguery with ruthless violence to attain power. Mark Milke does just that in his review of Tyrants: A History of Power, Injustice and Terror, a new book by Carleton University political scientist Waller Newell. It rejects materialist nostrums about the “root causes” of tyranny and terror, and instead locates their origins in revolutionary zeal and human bloodlust.

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  • Keeney - Main

    Regular C2C Journal contributor Mark Milke recently lamented the demise of the “Calgary School” of classical liberal academics who once dominated the political science department at the University of Calgary. They were a rare source of philosophical diversity in a Canadian academic world dominated by progressives. But there are others like them, including some of their protégés, and a dozen have contributed to a new collection of essays espousing classical liberalism as essential to civic education and democracy. Patrick Keeney reviews Liberal Education, Civic Education, and the Canadian Regime.

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  • ConservativeHeart-Cover

    If Justin Trudeau’s current poll numbers hold up and the Liberals win the federal election, conservatives will be angry, depressed, fearful, and astonished that Canadians would elect such a putz as prime minister. Eventually they’ll try to figure out what went wrong. And when they do, writes Trevor Shelley, they would be well-advised to consider the recommendations for a new conservative political narrative by Arthur C. Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute and author of The Conservative Heart: How To Build A Fairer, Happier, And More Prosperous America.

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  • This-Changes-Everything

    Naomi Klein’s new book This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. Climate, is not just another earnest plea for a return to Eden (although it is that too). More importantly, it’s a take-no-prisoners attack on the greenwash that muddies the whole debate about climate change. Not content to merely reject market-based solutions, Klein contends the sky is falling because of capitalism itself, and calls for its destruction. If Klein’s “Love Revolution” succeeds, writes C2C reviewer Colman Byfield, expect the proletariat to start stringing up eco-capitalists like Richard Branson and Bill Gates from LED lamp posts.

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  • Doughart - image

    Big corporations like Google and Facebook are making billions off the Internet but relatively little of it is trickling down to content creators. Worse, the robber barons of the Web are customizing content delivery so users only get what they “Like.” This is a menace to democracy, freedom and diversity, writes Astra Taylor in her new book, The People’s Platform. Underpaid reviewer Jackson Doughart wishes content consumers would pay a little more, but he disagrees with Taylor’s plan to put him on the government payroll…

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  • Flanagan

    “Gotcha” hissed the Idle No More activist after goading Tom Flanagan into an impolitic remark about child porn during a presentation about aboriginal policy at the University of Lethbridge. Within hours, a surreptitious video recording of the exchange went viral, and Flanagan became a human piñata, pummelled by enemies and friends alike. Paul Bunner reviews Professor Flanagan’s response in his new book: persona non grata…

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  • MacLeod Irons - Main image

    Generational interloper Angela MacLeod Irons takes a look at P.J. O’Rourke’s new book on the baby boomers, finding that O’Rourke is as entertaining as ever, but betrays a certain amount of narcissism on behalf of his generation.

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