• Paul Stanway’s long career in journalism has been almost entirely in the newspaper business. He was there in 1980, when the first Trudeau government sought to rescue the industry from “concentration of ownership,” even though it was actually the start of a golden age of competition, innovation and money-making in the print media. With newspapers now in irreversible decline due to the proliferation of online media, the second Trudeau government has launched a new rescue mission for Canadian journalism. It will be no more successful than the first, Stanway writes, and journalism will survive the transition from paper to digital because of the innate human desire for knowledge and understanding, not government intervention.

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  • Hannaford - Waterous Oil and gas business

    Sometimes the light at the end of the tunnel is an oncoming train. But with oil trading around C$70 a barrel, a couple of energy megaproject approvals in hand, and a new drill-baby-drill president in the White House, there’s more optimism in Canada’s oil and gas industry today than there has been for years. Nigel Hannaford drills beneath the “green shoots” and finds reasons for hope and dread.

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    At an anti-carbon tax rally at the Alberta Legislature in November, the crowd briefly mocked NDP Premier Rachel Notley with the “lock her up” chant that erupted at an Donald Trump campaign rallies whenever he attacked Hillary Clinton. It became a huge story, hailed as evidence that Trumpian sexism was spilling across the border. Last weekend, a young male demonstrator at anti-Trump “Women’s March” rally at the same location punched a female reporter for the right-wing Rebel Media in the face. The media response? Crickets at first, then skepticism. C2C editor Paul Bunner ponders the double standard.

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  • celeste-main

    Republican President and climate change denier Donald Trump has reached across the partisan divide to appoint Democratic eco-activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr. chair of a commission to investigate vaccine safety and scientific integrity. These strange bedfellows are united by their shared concerns about the alleged link between vaccines and serious illnesses like autism. As Celeste McGovern reports, it’s a big win for anti-vaxxers, and a big headache for Big Pharma.

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  • Ottawa Parliament Hill

    Why are Canadians so trusting of government regulations and regulators? Not only do they restrict personal and economic freedom, they routinely screw up and cause measurable harm to public health and safety. Canada needs to strike a better balance, writes Heather Bone, between government regulation and private sector self-regulation.

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  • People have been making ethical and health arguments against meat production and consumption for centuries. The vast majority of human omnivores ignore them and eat as much meat as they can afford. But now there’s a powerful new argument against meat – climate change. Cows, pigs and chickens are big contributors to greenhouse gases. As a result, writes Peter Shawn Taylor, the same folks who would wean us off carbon energy are now plotting a meat tax.

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  • cover_winter_2016_final

    C2C Journal has just released its latest issue: The New Campus Rebels – The University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson. Please download the Issue PDF here.

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  • hannaford-main

    One of Donald Trump’s blustery campaign promises was “if I’m president, you’re going to see Merry Christmas in department stores again, believe me.” A slap at Christophobes, it was typical of his politically incorrect comments on everything from feminism to climate change, terrorism to refugees. With President Trump setting the tone, writes Nigel Hannaford, the public square will become a much noisier, ruder and freer place.

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