• hutchinson-main

    Being a member of a Canadian First Nation has its privileges, such as a house on the reserve, tax exempt status, free post-secondary education, and the right to vote in band elections. But these benefits are by no means guaranteed, because band chiefs and councils decide who gets band membership and the associated entitlements. Their decisions are often arbitrary, ad hoc, discriminatory, and beyond the reach of Canadian law. Brian Hutchinson reports on the rising incidence of racial and gender discrimination on the hundreds of self-governing reserves across Canada.

    Read More »
  • robson-main

    Long-time Canadian journalist and faith activist Peter Stockland recently argued in C2C Journal that legalizing cannabis is a great leap down the road to perdition. Although his friend and fellow C2C contributor John Robson has similarly low expectations about the fate of modern culture, he doesn’t think civilization will end in a puff of cannabis smoke. In fact, writes Robson, for most people there is little harm and a lot of pleasure in a glass of good whisky and a toke of gourmet grass.

    Read More »
  • Doughart C2C Journal French Election Macron Nationalism

    The French had plenty of reasons to vote for the anti-immigrant, anti-EU, anti-Islam National Front party leader Marine Le Pen in Sunday’s presidential election. The Bataclan nightclub slaughter, the Bastille Day massacre in Nice, and the Charlie Hebdo killings, to name but three. Instead, two-thirds voted for the centrist liberal status quo, in the person of Emmanuel Macron, the young new leader of a new party. So the populist-nationalist wave that swept the United States and Britain during the last year has stalled again in continental Europe. But that doesn’t mean we’ve seen the end of it. Jackson Doughart explains.

    Read More »
  • mccaffrey-main

    Nowadays almost everybody describes themselves “fiscally conservative and socially liberal”. In recent years, the label has been applied to politicians as diverse as Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Stephen Harper, Justin Trudeau, and Tom Mulcair. When politicians as disparate as these can all fit this description, it signals our politics are divorced from philosophical principles. To make our political choices meaningful again, argues Peter McCaffrey, we need politicians and voters who are more ideological, not more moderate.

    Read More »
  • pope-main

    As voting begins in the Conservative Party of Canada leadership race, “Mad Max” Bernier is starting to look as unstoppable as Mel Gibson behind the wheel of a tricked out oil tanker. He’s got the endorsement of campaign drop-out Kevin O’Leary and broad support among mad-as-hell Conservatives who want radical change in Ottawa. But hang on, writes Alexandra Pope, an anybody-but-Bernier movement may be gathering around one of the other frontrunners.

    Read More »
  • speer-inset

    Canada Post willing, a quarter million Canadians who belong to the Conservative Party are now receiving ballots enabling them to vote for their next leader. Of the 14 names on the ballot, at least one will have dropped off by the time the campaign ends May 27 and at least eight have no hope of winning. Among the five who could win, none is a perfect combination of principled conservative, party unifier, and ideal competitor to take on Justin Trudeau and the Liberals. So what should guide Conservatives in their choices? Take the long view, advises Sean Speer: vote to uphold the traditions of Canadian conservatism founded by Sir John A. Macdonald; to respect the size and role of the state in a free market economy envisaged by Adam Smith; to respect the role for customs and tradition championed by Edmund Burke; and to expand the positive contributions both libertarian and social conservatives have made to Canada over many generations. In other words, Conservatives should choose the leader they believe will best serve the traditional values and principles of their movement, rather the short-term interests of their party.

    Read More »
  • stockland-main

    The imminent legalization of cannabis in Canada is prompting all kinds of anxiety. Will it make it even harder for teenagers’ brains to develop? Will stoned drivers slow traffic to a crawl? Will your plane’s pilot be higher than the aircraft? These may be the least of our worries. The bigger social menace of legal dope is that it will make more of us even dumber and more self-absorbed than we already are. Culturally speaking, writes Peter Stockland, the party’s about to get a lot duller.

    Read More »
  • hannford-email-main

    If you want peace, prepare for war. That idea kept the Roman Empire going for 500 years. After a bumpy first 100 days, it might also keep Donald Trump’s presidency going. Nobody’s calling him “Putin’s stooge” anymore, since the U.S. responded to the horrific sarin gas attack on civilians by Russia’s Syrian ally with a hail of cruise missiles. Now Trump’s telling the “crazy fat kid” in North Korea to “behave” and rattling his sabre at Iran. After some time away, the world’s cop is apparently back on the beat, reports Nigel Hannaford.

    Read More »