• Farrow

    For many thousands of years humans held a binary view of gender, mainly defined by the observable anatomical differences between males and females. But today, according to transgender activists and, increasingly, laws written for them, gender identity has nothing to do with physiology; it’s all in our heads. Western civilization has been slouching toward this revelation for a long time, writes theologian Douglas Farrow. We had to ditch God to get there, but “cracking the gender code” allows everyone to enter the kingdom of self-worship. Farrow won’t be going though. He has sworn off gender neutrality for Lent.

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  • keeney-inset

    Most mainstream conservative commentators in Canada and the United States were hostile toward Donald Trump when he was running for the presidency, and still are. Almost alone among the right-wing commentariat, Conrad Black backed him early, and often, and still does. But contrarian is the way it’s always been with Black, writes Patrick Keeney in a review of a new collection of Black columns; he never fails to challenge, inform, entertain – and surprise.

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  • cover_spring-2017-final

    C2C Journal has just released its latest issue: The Last Front Page – The future of journalism and democracy in the post-print world. Please download the Issue PDF here.

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  • Patrick Keeney is as smartphone-enslaved as the rest of us, but he’s more worried about it than most. Not for himself, but for civil society and democracy. Keeney sees modern digital communications technologies as exacerbating many of the most pernicious social trends of our time: mistrust of elites, rejection of family and community, and “hyper-individualism”. The messages conveyed by new digital mediums are mostly post-modern and progressive, which is not how anyone would describe New England Patriots’ coach and Super Bowl champion Bill Belichick. So it gave Keeney hope when he heard Belichick growl: “I’m not on SnapFace.”

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  • All the fearmongering in the mainstream media about Brexit, Donald Trump, fake news, Islamophobia, climate change, and the imminent end of civilization isn’t really about any of those things. It’s actually the death rattle of the MSM. The digitization of the news media is breaking up the corporate and ideological cartels that have dominated journalism for decades, writes Ryan Rados. They are about to be supplanted by hordes of citizen journalists who will diversify and democratize the news via the Internet. None of them will get rich but really, who should you trust to tell you the truth, a million-dollar-a-year network news anchor or a gumshoe reporter earning fractions of a cent per click?

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  • pope-main

    This article does not contain the real story about what happened on 9/11 or Barack
    Obama’s Kenyan birth certificate or proof that the Democrats operated a child sex ring in a Washington pizza joint. Instead it is Alexandra Pope’s rueful exploration of the fake news phenomenon and its explosive growth on social media. There’s a lie and a sucker who believes it born every millisecond on the Internet, and it’s getting harder and harder to separate fact from fiction. But Pope says there’s one sure way to get real news on the web –pay for it.

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  • hodgson-main

    Town criers once delivered local news. Then came community newspapers, then radio, then local TV stations. Then came the Internet, which is crushing those local news gathering and delivery systems and the financial models that sustained them. It’s hammering national newspapers and broadcast networks too, but there is something more immediate and ominous about the eclipse of local news. Jeff Hodgson wonders what happens to community without it, and looks for ways to bring it back.

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  • eisler-main

    If you believe that democracy needs journalism like humans need oxygen, then you should at least consider the argument that Canada needs more CBC. Until the private sector figures out how to make news profitable again, writes Dale Eisler, Mothercorp is our best bet for ensuring that Canadian journalism survives the transition from print and cable to the internet. Already the country’s largest news-gathering operation, it should quit sports and entertainment, go all news all the time, be resolutely fair and objective, and erect an impenetrable firewall between itself and the State.

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