• Aboriginal grievance and entitlement stories made a lot of news in Canada in June. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau renamed National Aboriginal Day as National Indigenous Peoples Day. He also renamed his office to erase its historic link to Hector Langevin, an architect of the residential schools system. And he gave the old American embassy in Ottawa to native groups. Still aboriginal activists weren’t satisfied. So they badgered an apology out of Governor General David Johnston for calling First Nations peoples immigrants. Which left Ettore Fiorani and Paul Bunner wondering, where on or off earth do these insatiably aggrieved activists come from?

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  • All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, according to the proverb. But what does all play and no work do to us? Thanks to the rapid acceleration of automation and artificial intelligence, we may be about to find out on a humanity-sized scale. With a guaranteed income and no job, and machines that can do anything we can do, only better, what will we do all day? Will it make us more creative and philanthropic, or more hedonistic and self-destructive? Ben Woodfinden weighs the odds.

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  • Donald Trump didn’t invent the post-truth phenomenon, he’s just a symptom of it. The current epidemic of truthlessness was conceived in post-modernism, gestated in our legal and academic institutions, and hatched in our own brains. Former Stephen Harper speechwriter Nigel Hannaford recently examined these hard truths in a presentation to students at Royal Roads University.

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  • Donald Trump opened his first international tour as U.S. President with a speech in Saudi Arabia announcing that America is no longer in the business of arbitrating and enforcing liberal values around the world. Autocratic nationalist strongmen from Moscow to Istanbul to Beijing took note, and all hell broke loose in the Middle East. Henry Gray reports.

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  • In 1972 Lou Reed offended conservatives with his hit Walk on the Wild Side, an admiring ode to his transgendered friend Holly, who left Miami as a he and became a she on the way to New York. In 2017 the song has offended progressives as a transphobic example of cultural appropriation. Madison McSweeney explains what a long, strange trip it’s been from conservative censorship to progressive censorship.

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  • Canada’s Liberal government announced a wholesale makeover of foreign and defence policy this week that repudiated much of what they ran on in 2015. Instead of cheap soft power diplomacy, they’re now promising expensive hard power militarism. It’s exactly what U.S. President Donald Trump wants Canada to do, but the Liberals say they’re doing it because they can’t depend on Trump to reliably defend the free world anyone. Whatever the case, writes Ettore Fiorani, this hawkish new Liberal doctrine is likely to go down badly with their voters and is therefore unlikely to last any longer than the Trump presidency.

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  • Anybody seen Sean Penn or Oliver Stone or Noam Chomsky in Caracas lately, pleading with angry, hungry Venezuelans to stop rioting against the Maduro government and support the revolutionary vision of the late socialist saint Hugo Chavez? How about Canadian Chavistas Linda McQuaig and Naomi Klein? Surely they all believe the country’s current economic and democratic meltdown is the result of a conspiracy by western capitalists and imperialists. They better get that story out quick, writes Ettore Fiorani, before they catch blame as enablers of the world’s next failed state.

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  • Within days of the Manchester terrorist bombing, British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn blamed U.K. foreign policy for inciting Islamist extremism. Prime Minister Theresa May immediately pounced, accusing Corbyn of blaming the victims. It was a typically guileless Corbyn blunder and a typically adroit May response. But May’s early successes as PM, which will likely include another Tory election win next month, aren’t just due to her lame opponent. She is the face of a bold new Toryism, writes Ben Woodfinden, one rooted in traditional British nationalism and communitarian ideals. Amid echoes of Thatcher, May is quickly emerging as the anglosphere’s most important conservative political leader.

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