• Canada’s federal government insists the only way to reduce carbon emissions is by putting a price on them. But it will take a helluva price to coerce Canadians to reduce their driving enough to make a dent in transportation emissions, which are a huge contributor. That’s why the provinces are revolting against Ottawa and the 2019 federal election is shaping up as a referendum on carbon taxation. Gwyn Morgan has a radically better idea that would massively reduce emissions without punishing consumers: incent Canadians to convert their vehicles from gasoline and diesel to far cleaner-burning natural gas by making NGV fuel tax-free. Lower Taxes for Lower Emissions sure sounds like a better campaign slogan than Pay Up or Park Your Car.

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  • 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War. Despite the passage of time, the events of that terrible human tragedy still have the power to horrify, inspire, and unleash our tears. Lest we forget the sacrifices of the Canadians who fought and died in that war and all the military conflicts that have tested our nation’s mettle, C2C Journal is marking Armistice Day with an essay by John Weissenberger that is bookended by the stories of the first and last Canadians who died in the Great War.

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  • Bribing voters with their own, other people’s, or borrowed money has a long history in Canada. The latest example is the Liberal government’s plan to price “pollution” in provinces without a carbon tax by making the tax rebate bigger than the tax itself. Another form of vote-buying, writes Matthew Lau, is labour regulation that forces employers to pay workers higher wages and provide greater benefits. When Ontario’s late Wynne government did this, it predictably hurt job growth. So the bribe failed, and the Ford government is now partially deregulating the labour market to make workers, and the provincial economy, more competitive.

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  • The line-up of speakers at last week’s hastily organized Energy Relaunch conference in Calgary was about as eclectic as you could get. It brought together pro- and anti-carbon tax conservatives and academics and journalists and a former federal Liberal leadership contender and even an Alberta NDP minister. Astonishingly, they all agreed on something: Ottawa has bungled energy and environment policy and Canada needs to get competitive on natural resource development again or we’ll all be much poorer.

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  • Military procurement is to Canada’s federal government as sewer upgrades are to municipal governments: a hugely expensive necessity that doesn’t win any votes. That’s why the RCAF is getting by with patched-up, near-obsolete CF-18s and a handful of used fighter jets from Australia as Ottawa’s posturing and procrastinating over their replacement enters its third decade. Meanwhile, military tensions between the world’s major powers are growing, which leaves weakly-armed and weak-willed countries like Canada increasingly useless and vulnerable. The ill-starred F-35 stealth fighter remains the best bet to restore our military capability while providing top-flight aerospace jobs, writes Mathew Preston, but “whipping out” the F-35 or any new warplanes is not a priority for Justin Trudeau’s feminist-pacifist administration.

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  • A police officer pulls you over on suspicion for some crime and seizes your car. Charges are never laid. But you don’t get your car back. Highway robbery by a rogue cop? Nope, this kind of seizure is perfectly legal, and not uncommon, in provinces that have civil forfeiture laws. It’s tarted up as compensation for victims of crime, but governments pocket most of the proceeds. Karen Selick’s story on this institutionalized abuse of due process focuses on the nightmarish persecution of Ontarians Maggie and Terry Reilly, innocent victims whose financial and personal lives were crippled by faceless bureaucrats who will never be held to account.

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  • Could the populist uprising now sweeping much of the western world erupt in Canada? The idea is as horrifying as it is inconceivable in the minds of the Laurentian intelligentsia. That explains their disdain for Stephen Harper’s new book Right Here, Right Now, a rumination on the causes and effects of Trump, Brexit, et al. But Barry Cooper thinks Harper is on to something in identifying the end of the Cold War, and the subsequent acceleration of globalization, as the catalysts for the “age of disruption” now upon us. Liberal and progressive elites are themselves becoming increasingly demagogic and reactionary in trying to put down the uprising, but their beloved “Universal and Homogenous State” may be headed for the dustbin of history, even in Canada.

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  • Canada has been singularly successful in offering up its natural resource sector to its enemies. In the 1980s and 90s, foreign-funded eco- and aboriginal activists teamed up with Canadian politicians, public sector unions, and even some corporate sell-outs to bully the B.C. forest industry into submission. Today it’s the energy sector that has been taken hostage and climbed into bed with its captors. Many of the same politicians and CEOs who sold Canada out for a myth of “social licence” are now changing their tune, writes Mark Milke, but it will take time to recover from the economic damage they’ve wrought.

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