• When he wasn’t kayaking on or swimming in the North Saskatchewan River near his home in Edmonton, C2C Journal editor Paul Bunner spent some of his summer fighting two battles for little freedoms in his local community. He won one and lost one. Although he’s a veteran political activist at the federal and provincial level, Bunner contends that the lifeblood of democracy must be nurtured at the foundations of society if it is to flourish at the top.

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  • Keynesianism is the fentanyl of economic policy. Canadian politicians of all stripes, at all levels, have been addicted to it for decades. Injected into the economy as stimulus, corporate welfare, boutique tax credits, or protectionism, it produces euphoric highs in public opinion polls. But eventually, inevitably, it kills the competitiveness, growth potential and borrowing capacity of its users. Twenty-five years ago, Canada swore off it, and enjoyed a long period of healthy economic growth. Then the Harper Conservative government fell off the wagon, and now the Trudeau Liberals are mainlining it. Will we ever learn, wonders Matthew Lau, to just say no to Keynes?

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  • Canadian self-described (but disputed) Aboriginal author Joseph Boyden and Tragic Hipster Gord Downie took the sad story of Chanie Wenjack, a 12-year-old Ojibway boy who froze to death in northern Ontario in 1966, and turned it into a book, songs and videos that grotesquely distort the truth in order to demonize the history of the Canadian Indian residential schools system. Now it’s being taught to children in schools across Canada. Robert MacBain reports.

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  • Ontario and Alberta used to be the reliable twin engines of Canada’s economy. They created jobs for refugees from the sclerotic economies of Atlantic Canada and provided tax transfers to subsidize statist Quebec Inc. Long suffering victims of socialist governments in Manitoba and Saskatchewan looked to their neighbours east and west with a mixture of envy and resentment, while a lot of British Columbians dismissed them as hyperactive greed heads with no appreciation for work-life balance. Those days are over, writes Mark Milke, as Ontario and Alberta are now smothering their competitive advantages with unaffordable green energy policies.

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  • Jagmeet Singh is a strong contender to win the federal NDP leadership next month. He’s young, handsome, well-spoken, a natty dresser, and progressive on all the right issues. Except one that his admirers never talk about: the bizarre belief he shares with Sikh extremists that India committed genocide in the Punjab 30 years ago. Oh, and he’s also a passionate defender of Muslim orthodoxy in the form of the niqab. In spite of these views, or perhaps because of them, he’s a progressive darling. But Gaurav Singhmar, an Edmonton writer who also has roots in the Punjab, urges New Democrats to give Singh a wide berth, even if he is a hottie.

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  • Vancouver father Adrian Crook believes self-reliance is one of the most important lessons a parent can teach their children. So he taught his four young kids how to take the bus to school. Some anonymous busybody felt they were too young and complained to B.C. child welfare authorities. They investigated and ordered him to desist, even though he hadn’t broken any law. It turns out they picked the wrong dad to try to bully, writes Brian Hutchinson, and now Crook is trying to teach the nanny state a lesson.

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  • Despite all its booms and busts, for most of its history Alberta has outperformed the rest of Canada in investment, business creation, economic growth, employment, population gain, and most other measures of prosperity. Today, nearly three years after the last energy price downturn, and two-and-a-half years into the carbon-phobic mandates of an NDP provincial government in Edmonton and a Liberal regime in Ottawa, Alberta is enduring a crippling divestment of capital, jobs and wealth, and waning confidence that it will ever recover from the current bust. George Koch tours the ruins, searching for his province’s salvation.

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  • Why does Sydney Crosby keep playing hockey after four concussions when he has $50 million in the bank? Why is Tom Brady trying for his 6th Super Bowl ring at 40? And why do millions of sports fans spend billions buying tickets, jerseys, cable TV subscriptions and all the other stuff that makes pro sport such a global economic behemoth? Plato knew the score, writes Ben Woodfinden, who reckons the great philosopher would approve of the way modern western society has channelled the innate human desire for glory into non-lethal entertainments for the masses.

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