• Oberto Oberti has been trying to build a year-round high-alpine ski resort in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern B.C. for almost 30 years. He has been obstructed every step of the way by governments, natives, environmentalists, NIMBYists, and competing ski resorts. This fall, Oberti’s Jumbo Glacier project finally caught a break, in a startling Supreme Court of Canada ruling against an aboriginal constitutional rights claim. But don’t break out the champagne powder just yet, cautions George Koch. His tale of institutionalized obstructionism shows how hard it is to build anything in Canada these days.

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  • In the beginning, Canada was good, pure, and peaceful. Then the Europeans came, and it all went to hell. This creation and fall story has been cribbed from Genesis to frame today’s powerful aboriginal grievance and entitlement narrative. Its authors are now suggesting that redemption lies in a return to indigenous utopia. But the devil’s in the historical details, writes Hymie Rubenstein, and he was just as busy in pre-Columbian Canada as anywhere else.

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  • When political leaders lose elections, most of them slink off to lick their wounds in private. Not Hillary Clinton and Michael Ignatieff. Both of them wrote books about how and why they lost. Tim Anderson reviews What Happened and Fire and Ashes and concludes that Clinton is the greater self-deluding narcissist.

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  • Hardly a day goes by in Canada without a progressive politician somewhere expressing shame for something their country has done. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, national self-flagellator in chief, did so on the world stage at the United Nations this fall. The right does it too, but their gripes about Canada are usually policy-specific, not aimed at the country’s entire history and culture. Mark Jacka wonders why the left has such a dismal opinion of their country, so devoid of any fair-minded historical or international context, and warns that national self-loathing may eventually lead to national self-destruction.

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  • The constitutional melodrama that gripped Canada for much of the last half of the 20th century was mostly scripted and performed by Laurentian elites in Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa seeking to appease Quebec nationalism. Among the westerners who took to the national stage to assert the constitutional primacy of “ten equal provinces” over “two founding nations”, few were louder or more influential than former B.C. cabinet minister and beloved talk radio host Rafe Mair. To mark Mair’s passing this month at 85, J.J. McCullough reviews the great talk jock’s career with admiration and affection.

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  • The Ontario elementary teachers’ union wants Sir John A. Macdonald’s name erased from schools. The Toronto District School Board wants “chief” removed from job titles. The Alberta curriculum is being rewritten to purge most history except colonial oppression. Discovery math is crippling student numeracy across Canada. And junior refused steak at dinner the other day because cow farts are destroying the planet. Why, it’s enough to drive mom or dad to quit their jobs and start home schooling. And the good news, writes Sean Speer, is that it’s never been easier to do just that.

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  • When he wasn’t kayaking on or swimming in the North Saskatchewan River near his home in Edmonton, C2C Journal editor Paul Bunner spent some of his summer fighting two battles for little freedoms in his local community. He won one and lost one. Although he’s a veteran political activist at the federal and provincial level, Bunner contends that the lifeblood of democracy must be nurtured at the foundations of society if it is to flourish at the top.

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  • Keynesianism is the fentanyl of economic policy. Canadian politicians of all stripes, at all levels, have been addicted to it for decades. Injected into the economy as stimulus, corporate welfare, boutique tax credits, or protectionism, it produces euphoric highs in public opinion polls. But eventually, inevitably, it kills the competitiveness, growth potential and borrowing capacity of its users. Twenty-five years ago, Canada swore off it, and enjoyed a long period of healthy economic growth. Then the Harper Conservative government fell off the wagon, and now the Trudeau Liberals are mainlining it. Will we ever learn, wonders Matthew Lau, to just say no to Keynes?

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