• Canada has been singularly successful in offering up its natural resource sector to its enemies. In the 1980s and 90s, foreign-funded eco- and aboriginal activists teamed up with Canadian politicians, public sector unions, and even some corporate sell-outs to bully the B.C. forest industry into submission. Today it’s the energy sector that has been taken hostage and climbed into bed with its captors. Many of the same politicians and CEOs who sold Canada out for a myth of “social licence” are now changing their tune, writes Mark Milke, but it will take time to recover from the economic damage they’ve wrought.

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  • What does it take to stop a multi-billion-dollar energy project that will create thousands of jobs and billions in tax revenues for Canadians? The answer is the headline on this story. Never has so much been withheld from so many by so few. Yet this week the federal government announced there will be no time limit on yet another round of “consultations” over the Trans Mountain pipeline. This is no way to run a credible country, writes Gwyn Morgan.

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  • Border security, terrorism, rising crime, Donald Trump, guns, trade wars; these are just a few of the anxieties afflicting Canadians. Well, pass the Zoloft, writes Jason Unrau. We’re going to need it to get through the coming year as politicians of all stripes and their media enablers ratchet up their fearmongering on these and other real and invented terrors in the runup to next October’s federal election.

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  • Historical cleansing in the name of ethnocentric injustice is all the rage in Canada today. We’re arresting, trying and punishing historical figures for crimes against modern interpretations of their words and actions. First among the fallen icons is the country’s founding prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, recently banished from a pedestal outside Victoria City Hall to a dingy civic warehouse where he awaits final sentencing. But John Robson has a message for those who deposed the Old Chieftain; you are not worthy to stand in the shadow of his statue.

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  • The ever-shifting scope of the constitutional “duty to consult” with aboriginal groups increasingly thwarts development in Canada, including resource projects critical to the country’s economic growth and prosperity. The recent court decision against the Trans Mountain pipeline is the highest-profile recent example. University of Calgary professor emeritus Tom Flanagan tracks the jurisprudence that elevated this legal concept into a de facto aboriginal veto and suggests ways that governments, with the support of pro-development aboriginal groups, could move to clearly define and limit its power.

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  • Here’s the lede on the Toronto Star story about last week’s Ontario government response to a court decision: “Premier Doug Ford has triggered the nuclear option in his battle to slash Toronto city council.” The “nuclear option” was the invocation of Section 33 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which enables democratically elected governments to overrule appointed judges in limited circumstances. The circumstances here had to do with how many politicians it takes to run Toronto. But OMG, according to the Star, the NDP opposition, and much of the media commentariat, Ford has blown up the rule of law in Canada. Oh please, writes Howard Anglin, he’s just exercised a legal tool created by the framers of the 1982 Constitution to maintain the balance of power between the legislative and judicial branches of government. High time, too.

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  • Progressives agree populism is deplorable, responsible for electing xenophobic governments in parts of Europe, the Brexit mess, and that Twit in the White House. But what about Ontario Conservative Premier Doug Ford? He’s “for the people” too, like other populists claim to be, but instead of picking fights with immigrants and launching trade wars, he’s lowering the cost of beer and energy and trying to shrink Toronto’s bloated City Council. The left and the courts are pushing back hard, but Ford still looks like Canada’s best bet to rescue populism from the pit of elite condescension. Jason Tucker reports.

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  • The term “gunboat diplomacy” was coined in 1850 when Britain dispatched the Royal Navy to defend a British citizen living in Greece. Last month, Canada’s Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland dispatched a tweet to defend Saudi Arabian women’s rights activists who happen to have a Canadian relative. Unlike the Greeks, the Saudis were not intimidated, and they fired back with trade and diplomatic weapons that cost Canada dearly. Gerry Bowler has some advice for Freeland, who apparently could use it: either ditch the impotent virtue signalling or hit the Saudis where it hurts by replacing their oil exports to Canada with homegrown western crude.

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